hips play an essential part in your daily activities and workout performances as well. The hips propel us while walking, going upstairs, as well as supporting us in kneeling and squatting. If your hip muscles have suffered from pain and tightness, they can reduce your range of motion throughout the joint, weaken your glutes, and tilt your pelvis, causing excessive curvature in your spine as well as low backaches. In short, having strong and flexible hips is the key to achieve good sports performances.

Try these five hip openers to keep your hips mobile and healthy

  1. FROG

Frog pose stretches out your inner thighs, groin, and hips. For the athlete, Frog should be a vital part of the routine. From hockey and soccer players to base runners and triathletes, groin pain from quick agility moves will totally disappear with Frog pose.

Step-to-step instruction

START: Get on your hands and knees, in a tabletop position.

FINISH: Slowly widen your knees out as far as they can go and bring your feet in line with your knees. Your shins should be parallel with one another. Flex your feet and ease yourself forward onto your forearms. If the stretch is too intense, try putting your arms on a block or firm pillow. Hold for eight to 12 breaths and then release. If holding the stretch for longer, try slowly moving your hips forward and backward to bring the stretch to different parts of your hips.

  1. BUTTERFLY STRETCH

Butterfly Pose is a wonderful stretch to increase the mobility of the hip joints and stretches the inner thigh. It is also good for relaxing and stretching the aching thighs. Regular practice of this posture will facilitate in easing the pain related to a high-intensity workout.

Step-to-step instruction

START: Sit with your spine erect and legs spread straight out.

FINISH: Bend your knees and bring your feet towards the pelvis. The soles of your feet should touch each other. Grab your feet tightly with your hands. Make an effort to bring the heels as close to the genitals as possible. Press the thighs and knees downward towards the floor. Now start flapping both the legs up and down like the wings of a butterfly. Start slow and gradually increase the speed. Do this movement for about 1 minute and then release. Straighten the legs out in front of you and relax.

  1. SQUATTING INTERNAL ROTATIONS

Being able to produce and resist rotation at the hip is just as important as ankle flexibility. Squatting Internal Rotation is ideal to release tightness and pain in your hips, as well as increase blood flow and circulation.

Step-to-step instruction

 START: Get into a deep squat position (as deep as you can go).

FINISH: Rotate one knee inward, down toward the ground. This stretch can be done sitting on a small stool if you cannot get into a comfortable squat position. Hold that ground position for a second or two, and then come back up into the squat. Repeat on the other side. This is a dynamic stretch so do not hold this pose for too long.

  1. KNEELING LUNGE

Lunges are an excellent means for stretching the hip flexors both dynamically and statically. Begin each workout, whether it’s strength or conditioning, with a few sets of lunges to reduce your risk of injury and prepare your legs and hips for anything.

Step-to-step instruction

START: Get into a lunge position with your right foot between your hands, step your left foot behind.

FINISH: Then lower your left knee to the floor and, keeping the right knee fixed in place, slide the left back until you feel a comfortable stretch in the left front thigh and groin. Turn the top of your left foot to the floor. Keep the chest tall and the hips square. To make the stretch harder, you can pull the back knee up off the ground. Hold for 5 seconds and then release.

  1. PIGEON

Pigeon pose is a really tough posture even with advanced trainees. This pose is ideal for increasing external range of motion of femur in hip socket, as well as lengthen hip flexors. If you practice it consistently, you’ll notice more ease in your lower half as you sit, walk, and stand.

Step-to-step instruction

START: Place your front knee bent at a 90-degree angle. Extend your left leg behind you so your kneecap and the top of your foot rest on the floor.

FINISH: Press through your fingertips as you lift your torso away from your thigh. Lengthen the front of your body. Draw down through your front leg shin and balance your weight evenly between your right and left hips. Flex your front foot. Press down through the tops of all five toes of the back foot. Hold this position for 1 minute then release.

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