ean you are not getting enough protein and other essential vitamin and mineral. Many people rely on eggs and dairy product to increase their protein intake when they start their vegan lifestyle. However, you can totally stay healthy and energetic without consuming animals’ products with a 100 percent plant-based diet. Here is some food to structure your transition to veganism, just be sure to tailor them to your specific needs.

  1. ALMONDS

Source: www.besthealthmag.ca

Protein: 21g per 100g serving

If you are looking for nuts to revolutionize your diet, almonds are one of the best options for you. A handful of almonds has more protein than an egg and contains energy-boosting manganese and copper, which limit the free radicals that can hinder mitochondria. Adding 10 almonds to your daily meal plan can help you reach your nutrient needs. The high-protein content in almonds help repair and maintain nearly every part of your body, including muscles, skin, hair, nail, and blood. What are you waiting for? Consider topping your salads with slivered almonds or snack on a few with your mid-afternoon protein shake.

  1. CASHEWS

Source: www.livestrong.com

Protein: 18g per 100g serving

Cashews are an excellent source of protein, minerals, and vitamins that you can include them into a plant-based healthy diet. In addition to a decent protein punch, cashews contain 20% of the recommended intake of magnesium, along with 12% of the recommended intake of vitamin K—two essential bone-building nutrients. Although cashews contain unsaturated fat, which is healthier than saturated, they are still high in calories. Like other fatty nuts, you should eat cashews in moderation as they can still lead to weight gain through overeating, and choose plain, unsalted nuts.

  1. SUN-DRIED TOMATOES

Source: www.geniuskitchen.com

Protein: 14g per 100g serving

Surprised when looking at the number? It’s definitely a new discovery for those who want to increase their protein intake. One cup of sun-dried tomatoes has 139 calories, 8 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber, which makes for an easy protein boost if you’re tucking them into sandwiches, pasta, or chopping them into salads. Moreover, a serving of sun-dried tomatoes delivers further heart benefits by providing 6 percent of the recommended daily intake of calcium and 25 percent of magnesium.

  1. BRUSSEL SPROUTS

Source: dishbydish.net

Protein: 3.4g per 100g serving

Brussels sprouts are quite expensive and seem to come out only at Christmas and Thanksgiving. However, eating more of these low-calorie brussels sprouts could add great benefits to your diet. Not only are Brussels sprouts a good source of protein, but they also offer a great amount of iron, potassium, and folate. Although the sprouts lack several of the amino acids necessary to make it a complete protein like meat or dairy, you can include grains, such as brown rice or whole wheat pasta, in your diet to obtain all the amino acids you need.

  1. MUSHROOM

Source: www.delicious.com.au

Protein: 3.1g per 100g serving

The key to getting enough vitamins and minerals through your diet is to eat a colorful variety of fruits and vegetables. Mushrooms are one of the excellent sources on the earth to increase your overall health. Most mushrooms have a high protein content, usually around 20-30% by dry weight. This can be useful for vegetarians or anyone looking to increase their protein intake. Get your beef stroganoff ready for a big dose of protein-packed mushrooms. These magical little things are super delicious, nutritious – packed with Vitamin D, Folate and Vitamin B2.

  1. BROCCOLI

Source: www.ravennaedintorni.it

Protein: 2.8g per 100g serving

Broccoli is not only a great source of fiber but it also contains a high amount of protein. 100 grams of chopped broccoli has 2.8 grams of protein. This means by eating that amount men get 5 percent of their recommended daily intake of 56 grams, while women get 6 percent of the 46 grams of protein they should consume daily. What’s more? Scientists have proved that broccoli is extremely suitable for preventing breast and uterus cancer. Broccoli delivers a healthy sulforaphane, a compound to thwart cancer by stimulating the body’s detoxifying enzymes. With a broad range of minerals and vitamins, you can use cooked or raw broccoli as a main menu item. Eat broccoli in salads, soups, or simply steamed by itself with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. 

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